The Difference Between Major & Minor Pentatonic Scales For Guitar

I still do not get how you make one minor pentatonic scale pattern into a major pattern other than starting on the 2nd scale degree without that works for all the patterns (is that right?).

Only the second note in pentatonic scale pattern one is the major root. Whatever that note is, it's always the major root as you shift into other patterns.

PATTERN 2: It ends up being the first note in pattern two.

PATTERN 3: It's the first note on string four in pattern three.

PATTERN 4: It's the second note on string five in pattern four.

PATTERN 5: It's the first note on string five in pattern five.

Changing the pentatonic scale from minor to major is not really about where you start, but rather what you're playing over. Pentatonic scale pattern one in the open position played over an E root will sound like E minor pentatonic. The same notes played over a G root will sound like G major pentatonic.

Try this:

MINOR PENTATONIC

Play pentatonic scale pattern one in the open position over the song "Cocaine" by Eric Clapton. Notice that because the chord changes revolve around E, the scale does also and produces a minor tonality.

MAJOR PENTATONIC

Now play the same scale pattern over the song "Wonderful Tonight" by Eric Clapton. Notice that because the chord changes revolve around G, the scale does also and produces a major tonality.

Knowing the difference between the two pentatonic scale tons is critical to understanding music theory for guitar and popular music. And developing a good working knowledge of guitar theory requires that you move beyond the printed page and hear chords and scales in action. Remember to learn and play along with lots of songs, record yourself, utilize jam tracks, and play with other musicians.

Source by Desi Serna

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